O que é este blog?

Este blog trata basicamente de ideias, se possível inteligentes, para pessoas inteligentes. Ele também se ocupa de ideias aplicadas à política, em especial à política econômica. Ele constitui uma tentativa de manter um pensamento crítico e independente sobre livros, sobre questões culturais em geral, focando numa discussão bem informada sobre temas de relações internacionais e de política externa do Brasil. Para meus livros e ensaios ver o website: www.pralmeida.org.

Mostrando postagens com marcador João Carlos Espada. Mostrar todas as postagens
Mostrando postagens com marcador João Carlos Espada. Mostrar todas as postagens

segunda-feira, 11 de fevereiro de 2019

Churchill, by Andrew Roberts - book review by Joao Carlos Espada

Mais uma resenha de um livro do qual já li outras resenhas – aqui postadas, por sinal – e vários trechos, a partir do que está livremente disponível na Amazon-Kindle.
Destaco um trecho, sobre os grandes erros de Churchill, para demonstrar que a nova biografia não é uma hagiografia, como destacado pelo resenhista, o prof. João Carlos Espada, um churchilliano português, diretor do Instituto de Estudos Políticos da Universidade Católica de Portugal, a quem conheci pessoalmente no quadro do Estoril Political Forum, do qual participei em 2017 e 2018.

The biographer provides a long list of mistakes throughout the whole book and, just in case the reader has missed any, there is a full page summary of them on page 966. It includes “his opposition to votes for women, continuing the Gallipoli operation after March 1915, rejoining the Gold Standard, supporting Edward VIII during the Abdication Crisis, mismanaging the Norway Campaign,  browbeating Stanislaw Mikolajczyk to accept the Curzon Line as Poland’s post-war frontier, making the ‘Gestapo’ speech during the 1945 general election campaign, remaining as prime minister after his stroke in 1953, and more besides.

Leiam a resenha abaixo.
Paulo Roberto de Almeida
Brasília, 11 de fevereiro de 2019

Andrew Roberts Takes the Measure of the Populist Aristocrat, Churchill

The obvious questions to be asked by the prospective reader of Andrew Roberts’ 1,105-page biography of Winston Churchill: Why another one? Could there be anything that has not yet been said or written about Churchill? If so, could there be enough to fill such an imposing volume?  
These questions are certainly pertinent and ought to be asked. But they ought not to prevent the reader from critically looking at this book. If one does so—and this reviewer frankly began it with a skeptical eye—one can hardly be disappointed. Churchill: Walking with Destiny is a page-turner, and it is full of new material that has not been previously available to Churchill scholars.
As Roberts acknowledges at the outset, he was the first historian to have “the gracious permission of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II . . . to have unfettered access to the whole of her father King George VI’s wartime diaries.” These of course include King George VI’s notes about his weekly lunches with Churchill during World War II. Roberts makes good use of these highly instructive notes and quotes them throughout the narrative.
Another source not previously used by biographers of Churchill is the recently published diaries of the Soviet ambassador to the Court of St. James, Ivan Maisky. It is indeed surprising the amount of relevant information that Roberts manages to extract from Maisky’s account. There are several other sources that the author was allowed to consult, including the visitors’ book at Chartwell (Churchill’s country house) and the minutes of the Other Club, which was founded by Churchill around 1911. 
On top of all this, Roberts manages to mobilize these tremendous sources (and many others, including the diaries of Mary Soames, Churchill’s youngest daughter, which are now at the Churchill Archives at Cambridge) into a well-paced narrative that is full of exciting passages—which matches  perfectly the venturesome spirit of Winston Churchill.
To Walk with Destiny Is Not to be Infallible 
This biography, moreover, does justice to its subtitle: “Walking with destiny.” We are reminded early on that Churchill, born in 1874, “had believed in his own destiny since at least the age of sixteen when he told a friend that he would save Britain from a foreign invasion.” In the Gathering Storm (1948), the first volume of his war memoirs, he wrote that upon his appointment as prime minister, he “felt as if I was walking with destiny.” Then Roberts lays out his intention in this work: to explore “the extraordinary degree to which in 1940 Churchill’s past life had indeed been a preparation for his leadership in the Second World War.”
This is no hagiography, since Roberts means to show that much of Churchill’s preparation came in the form of making mistakes. The biographer provides a long list of mistakes throughout the whole book and, just in case the reader has missed any, there is a full page summary of them on page 966. It includes “his opposition to votes for women, continuing the Gallipoli operation after March 1915, rejoining the Gold Standard, supporting Edward VIII during the Abdication Crisis, mismanaging the Norway Campaign,  browbeating Stanislaw Mikolajczyk to accept the Curzon Line as Poland’s post-war frontier, making the ‘Gestapo’ speech during the 1945 general election campaign, remaining as prime minister after his stroke in 1953, and more besides.” 
Doing things wrong is what somehow allowed Churchill to be right about “all three of the mortal threats posed to Western civilisation, by the Prussian militarists in 1914, the Nazis in the 1930s and 1940s and Soviet Communism after the Second World War.” 
Be it noted that the idea of “walking with destiny” could be misleading if it were dissociated from the reasons—moral, political, philosophical—that led Churchill to fight the crucial battles he fought. Some of his contemporaries described him as an opportunist and as one who craved fame. Roberts quotes many of these critical, sometimes very critical, appraisals of Winston from his school days to the very end of his life. Roberts acknowledges the self-regarding adventurer in Churchill; but that spirit of adventure was rooted in something else that gave it substance. This moral anchor, as it were, is described by Roberts as being twofold: Churchill’s defense of the specificity of the political traditions of the British Empire and of the English-speaking peoples; and his aristocratic background.
Roberts argues persuasively that Churchill’s aristocratic background gave him a sense of independence and self-confidence. That background, he says, “sits uncomfortably today with his image as the saviour of democracy, but had it not been for the unconquerable self-confidence of his caste background he might well have tailored his message to his political circumstances during the 1930s, rather than treating such an idea with disdain.”
Churchill, he adds, “never suffered from middle-class deference or social anxiety, for the simple reason that he was not middle-class, and what the respectable middle classes thought was not important to the child born at Blenheim [Palace].”
This immediately reminded me of my first visit to that splendid site (which Queen Anne had ordered built for Churchill’s ancestor, the Duke of Marlborough, as a reward for his military feats in 1705) in the early 1990s. I was struck by the magnificence of the place. And my first thought, which I still vividly remember, was that someone born at Blenheim Palace could not easily do as he was told—especially if the orders came from “that man,” the despicable corporal Hitler (or from Comrade Stalin, for that matter).
In other words, I think Churchill’s British (as contrasted with Continental European) aristocratic background gave him a sense of rebellion against arbitrary commands from centralized powers—though not necessarily against the opinions of the common people. In fact, as Roberts rightly emphasizes, Churchill always recommended that one should “trust the people.” Describing the political philosophy of his father, the statesman Randolph Churchill, Winston wrote:
He saw no reason why the old glories of Church and State, of King and Country, should not be reconciled with modern democracy; or why the masses of working people should not become the chief defenders of those ancient institutions by which their liberties and progress had been achieved.
According to Roberts, Churchill’s aristocratic background gave him also, or perhaps mainly, a sense of duty towards the people and the nation. Writes the biographer:
His political opinions essentially stemmed from Disraeli’s Young England movement of the 1840s, whose sense of noblesse oblige assumed eternal superiority but also instinctively appreciated the duties of the privileged towards the less well off. The interpretation Churchill gave to the obligations of aristocracy was that he and his class had a profound responsibility towards his country, which had the right to expect his lifelong service to it.
“Like a true aristocrat, [he] was no snob,” Roberts sagely points out. Recalling that Churchill’s closest friends were taken from a wide social circle, the biographer draws our attention to the remarkable episode retold in Churchill’s My Early Life (1930) of the visit Winston received at boarding school from his beloved nanny, Mrs. Everest, in 1892. The lad walked with her arm-in-arm throughout the school down to the railway station and “even had the courage to kiss her,” completely ignoring and defying his snobbish contemporaries.
This aristocratic dimension of Churchill was associated with some crucial political and moral ideas that he thought were worth fighting, and even dying, for. Preeminent among these was the man’s belief in a common “history of the English-speaking peoples,” and of course this became the title of his last book, published in four volumes in 1955, but in fact started in 1932. Churchill (whose mother was American, one should bear in mind) defined this common heritage at many occasions that Roberts duly acknowledges.
The Honor that Comes of Serving a Great Cause
Perhaps one of the most telling definitions was offered in the course of an address Churchill made at Harvard University in 1943, when he was awarded an honorary degree:
Law, language, literature—these are considerable factors. Common conceptions of what is right and decent, a marked regard for fair play, especially to the weak and poor, a stern sentiment of impartial justice, and above all the love of personal freedom. . . . If we are together, nothing is impossible. If we are divided all will fail. I therefore preach continually the doctrine of the fraternal association of our two peoples . . . for the sake of service to mankind and for the honour that comes to those who faithfully serve great causes.
A remarkable example of this common Anglo-American commitment to liberty and duty (as Edmund Burke put it) can be found in one seemingly small detail in this massive biography. It comes by way of a  personal letter that Churchill’s wife, Clementine, wrote to him in 1940, in which she said:
It seems that your Private Secretaries have agreed to behave like schoolboys and ‘take what is coming to them’ and then escape out of your presence shrugging their shoulders . . . I must confess that I have noticed a deterioration in your manner, and you are not so kind as you used to be. It is for you to give the orders and if they are bungled—except for the King, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Speaker—you can sack anyone and everyone. Therefore with this terrific power you must combine urbanity, kindness and if possible Olympic calm. You used to quote ‘On ne règne sur les âmes que par le calme’. I cannot bear that those who serve the country and yourself should not love you as well as admire and respect you.
Roberts marvels, and leads us to marvel, that in a moment of great peril for the nation, and all free nations, “the British Prime Minister could be upbraided by his wife for being short tempered.” He adds that it was hardly likely anyone “was saying this to Churchill’s opposite number in the Reich Chancellery.” British ways, at their best, include an accountability that spares no one, however exalted. 

João Carlos Espada is director of the Institute for Political Studies at the Catholic University of Portugal and chairs the International Churchill Society of Portugal. His book The Anglo-American Tradition of Liberty: A View from Europe was published by Routledge in 2016 (paperback, 2018).

quarta-feira, 28 de junho de 2017

O Apelo de Praga para a Renovacao da Democracia (texto em portugues)

Tomei conhecimento deste "manifesto" de uma coalizão em favor da democracia numa postagem de artigo do professor João Carlos Espada,  duplamente diretor do Instituto de Estudos Políticos da Universidade Católica de Portugal e da revista Nova Cidadania, no site do Observador (http://observador.pt/opiniao/o-apelo-de-praga-coligacao-para-a-renovacao-democratica/), pouco tempo antes de partir a Portugal, para participar, a seu convite e da diretora do programa, Prof. Rita Seabra Brito, do Estoril Political Forum, magnífico conclave de intelectuais, acadêmicos e responsáveis por think tanks e ONGs comprometidos com os ideais democráticos em diversos países do mundo.

Eu já tinha postado o apelo, em sua versão original em inglês, neste mesmo espaço, com a lista de seus primeiros signatários (infelizmente não há nenhum do Brasil, a despeito de nele vermos os nomes de personalidades democráticas de países tão "difíceis" para a democracia quanto a China, Cuba, Arábia Saudita, Venezuela), neste link: 
http://diplomatizzando.blogspot.pt/2017/06/a-chamada-de-praga-para-renovacao-da.html

Ao participar do Forum, encerrado nesta quarta-feira 28 de junho, depois de três dias de intensos debates e apresentações, indaguei do Professor Espada se existia uma versão em Português deste apelo, e ele informou-me que não. Providenciei, assim, rapidamente, uma versão não oficial em Português deste importante documento, que deve, previsivelmente, servir de base para uma vigorosa defesa da democracia em todos os lugares nos quais ela se encontra ameaçada.
Pessoalmente, não compro a tese de que o Brasil seja uma sociedade democrática consolidada. Se assim considerarmos, temos pelo menos de admitir que se trata de uma democracia de baixíssima qualidade, com instituições formais talvez adequadas a seu objetivo principal, mas muitas vezes ocupadas por responsáveis pouco responsáveis, digamos assim. Basta conferirmos, por exemplo, a realidade em nosso país, em meio a investigações de caráter policial e a cargo do poder judiciário, com este trecho do apelo de Praga, que lista os diversos princípios de uma formação política democrática: 

"... a eleição regular dos funcionários governamentais por meio de um processo de escolha verdadeiramente livre, justo, aberto e competitivo; amplas oportunidades, além das eleições, para que os cidadãos participem e vocalizem suas preocupações; transparência governamental e prestação de contas, ambas asseguradas por meio de um forte sistema constitucional de pesos e contrapesos e da supervisão da sociedade civil; um vigoroso primado do direito, garantido por um judiciário independente; uma economia de mercado que esteja isenta de corrupção e conceda oportunidades para todos; e uma cultura democrática feita de tolerância, de civilidade e de não-violência."

Transcrevo, portanto, aqui abaixo, minha versão do "manifesto" em sua íntegra, seguindo-se a lista de seus atuais signatários (e seus respectivos países, em inglês), entre os quais se encontra o professor João Carlos Espada, a quem agradeço a excepcional boa acolhida que nos foi patrocinada, a mim e a Carmen Lícia Palazzo, durante os quatro dias nos quais permanecemos no Estoril. Estendo igualmente minha apreciação e o nosso reconhecimento a todos os demais organizadores e promotores do evento, entre os quais se encontra o professor João Pereira Coutinho, colunista do jornal Folha de São Paulo e que pode ser chamado de maior "brasilianista" português.
Espero que este "manifesto" sirva de documento de apoio aos diversos movimentos e a todas as pessoas que, no Brasil e em outros países, lutam pelo estabelecimento de um verdadeiro sistema democrático, livre da corrupção e de tantas deformações e desvios em suas instituições de Estado.
Paulo Roberto de Almeida 
Estoril, Portugal, 29 de junho de 2017


O Apelo de Praga para a Renovação Democrática
Adotado em Praga em 26 de maio de 2017

A democracia liberal está sob ameaça, e todos os que a prezam devem sair em sua defesa.
A democracia está sendo ameaçada de fora por regimes despóticos na Rússia, na China e em outros países que estão endurecendo a repressão no plano interno e expandindo seu poder globalmente, preenchendo o vácuo deixado pelo poder, pela influência e pela autoconfiança declinantes nas democracias longevas. Os autoritários estão usando velhas armas de hard power assim como as novas mídias sociais e um crescente arsenal de soft power para criar uma ordem mundial pós-democrática na qual as normas de direitos humanos e o primado do direito são substituídos pelo princípio da soberania estatal absoluta.
A democracia também está sendo ameaçada por dentro. O anti-liberalismo está em ascensão na Turquia, na Hungria, nas Filipinas, na Venezuela e em outros contextos de retrocesso democrático. Em outros países – mesmo democracias antigas – o apoio à democracia liberal erodiu em anos recentes, especialmente entre os mais jovens, que não têm memória das lutas contra o totalitarismo. A fé nas instituições democráticas tem declinado por algum tempo, na medida em que os governos se mostram incapazes de lidar com os complexos novos desafios da globalização, que os processos políticos parecem crescentemente esclerosados e disfuncionais, e que as burocracias gerenciando as instituições tanto nacionais quanto as globais parecem distantes e prepotentes. Somando-se às dificuldades, a violência terrorista criou uma clima de medo que é usado por déspotas e demagogos para justificar o poder autoritário e restrições às liberdades.
Tais problemas têm causado ansiedade disseminada, hostilidade contra as elites políticas e cinismo com respeito à democracia – sentimentos que fortaleceram a ascensão de movimentos políticos e de partidos antissistema. Esses sentimentos, por sua vez, foram alimentados e inflamados por desinformação autoritária que cada vez mais penetra no espaço de mídia das democracias. A última pesquisa da Freedom House revela que direitos políticos e liberdades civis têm estado em declínio por onze anos consecutivos e, neste ano, as democracias estabelecidas dominam a lista de países sofrendo retrocessos em matéria de liberdades.
Coletivamente, tais fatores – a retração geopolítica do Ocidente, o ressurgimento de forças políticas autoritárias, a erosão da crença nos valores democráticos e a perda da fé na eficácia das instituições democráticas – acarretaram uma interrupção histórica na marcha do progresso democrático e ameaçam com uma possível “onda reversa” de rupturas democráticas. Os apoiadores da democracia devem se unir para frear tal retrocesso e para organizar uma nova coalizão em prol de sua retomada moral, intelectual e política.
O ponto de partida de uma nova campanha pela democracia é a reafirmação dos princípios fundamentais que inspiraram a expansão da democracia moderna desde o seu nascimento, mais de dois séculos atrás. Tais princípios estão enraizados numa crença na dignidade da pessoa humana e na convicção de que a democracia liberal é o sistema político que melhor pode salvaguardar tal dignidade e permitir que ela floresça. Entre tais princípios, estão os direitos humanos fundamentais, incluindo as liberdades básicas de expressão, de associação e de religião; o pluralismo político e social; a existência de uma vibrante sociedade civil que dê poder aos cidadãos em suas bases; a eleição regular dos funcionários governamentais por meio de um processo de escolha verdadeiramente livre, justo, aberto e competitivo; amplas oportunidades, além das eleições, para que os cidadãos participem e vocalizem suas preocupações; transparência governamental e prestação de contas, ambas asseguradas por meio de um forte sistema constitucional de pesos e contrapesos e da supervisão da sociedade civil; um vigoroso primado do direito, garantido por um judiciário independente; uma economia de mercado que esteja isenta de corrupção e conceda oportunidades para todos; e uma cultura democrática feita de tolerância, de civilidade e de não-violência.
Esses princípios estão sendo desafiados hoje, não apenas por partidários do anti-liberalismo e da xenofobia, mas também por intelectuais relativistas que negam que alguma forma de governo possa ser sustentada como superior. Embora a democracia seja frequentemente considerada uma ideia Ocidental, seus mais ardorosos defensores atualmente são pessoas de sociedades não-Ocidentais que continuam lutando por liberdades democráticas mesmo em face de possibilidades assustadoras. Suas lutas confirmam a universalidade da ideia democrática, e o seu exemplo pode contribuir para o renascimento das convicções democráticas no mundo das democracias avançadas.
Apesar de seu valor intrínseco, a sobrevivência da democracia não pode ser assegurada a menos que demonstre sua capacidade de ajudar as sociedades a enfrentar os desafios de um mundo instável e cambiante. Reconhecemos a forte insatisfação e a insegurança de amplos segmentos das sociedades democráticas e acreditamos que a democracia só será forte se nenhum grupo for deixado para trás.
Ao mesmo tempo em que a democracia encarna valores universais, ela existe em um contexto nacional particular, que Vaclav Havel chamou de “tradições intelectuais, espirituais e culturais que adicionam substância e lhe dão significado”. A cidadania democrática, enraizada em tais tradições, necessita ser reforçada, não levada à atrofia numa era de globalização. A identidade nacional é muito importante para ser entregue à manipulação de déspotas e de populistas demagógicos.
A defesa dos valores democráticos não é um produto de luxo ou um empreendimento puramente idealista. Ela é uma pré-condição de sociedades decentes e inclusivas, a moldura para o progresso social e econômico de pessoas no mundo todo e o fundamento para a preservação da paz e da segurança internacional.
Uma nova Coalizão para a Renovação Democrática servirá como um catalisador moral e intelectual para a revitalização da ideia democrática. O objetivo é mudar o ambiente intelectual e cultural por meio de uma apaixonada batalha de ideias baseada em princípios e informação; defendendo a democracia contra seus críticos; trabalhando para fortalecer as instituições mediadoras e as associações civis; e modelando argumentos persuasivos em prol da democracia liberal que possam definir o curso das discussões públicas. Será igualmente necessário partir para a ofensiva contra os opositores autoritários da democracia, demonstrando solidariedade aos povos corajosos que estão lutando por liberdades democráticas e exibindo os crimes dos cleptocratas que roubam e oprimem seu próprio povo, falsificam os registros políticos e históricos, e buscam dividir e difamar as democracias estabelecidas.
A Coalizão também será um amplo e interativo fórum para o intercâmbio de ideias sobre os melhores meios de encarar os novos e complexos desafios da democracia, tais como a estagnação ou o declínio dos padrões de vida de muitos cidadãos, a reação contrária à crescente imigração, a ascensão da “política da pós-verdade” na era da mídia social, e a erosão do apoio à democracia liberal. Esse centro global também defenderá e promoverá formas efetivas de ação para reanimar a fé na eficácia das instituições democráticas.
Não existem desculpas para o silêncio ou para a inação. Nós não ousamos nos apegar à ilusão de segurança em um tempo no qual a democracia está em perigo. A presente crise oferece uma oportunidade para que democratas comprometidos se mobilizem, e nós precisamos fazê-lo.
Lista de Signatários

Mike Abramowitz, USA
Svetlana Alexievich, Belarus
Manal Al-Sharif, Saudi Arabia
Anne Applebaum, USA
Oscar Arias Sánchez, Costa Rica
Shlomo Avineri, Israel
Sergio Bitar, Chile
Igor Blaževič, Czech Republic
Ladan Boroumand, Iran /France
Martin Bútora, Slovakia
Juan Pablo Cardenal, Spain
Scott Carpenter, USA
David Clark, UK
Irwin Cotler, Canada
Manuel Cuesta Morúa, Cuba
Frederik Willem de Klerk, South Africa
Neelam Deo, India
Larry Diamond, USA
João Carlos Espada, Portugal
Francis Fukuyama, USA
William Galston, USA
Chito Gascon, Philippines
Carl Gershman, USA
Leonid Gozman, Russia
Vartan Gregorian, USA
Emmanuel Gyimah-Boadi, Ghana
Barbara Haig, USA
Amr Hamzawy, Egypt
Ivan Havel, Czech Republic
Toomas Hendrik Ilves, Estonia
Ramin Jahanbegloo, Iran/Canada
Vladimir Kara-Murza, Russia
Garry Kasparov, USA/Russia
Mikhail Kasyanov, Russia
Zoltán Kész, Hungary
Maina Kiai, Kenya
Jakub Klepal, Czech Republic
Ivan Krastev, Bulgaria
Enrique Krauze, Mexico
Péter Krekó, Hungary
Walter Laqueur, USA
Nathan Law, Hong Kong
Bernard-Henri Lévy, France
Mario Vargas Llosa, Peru
Rafael Marques de Morais, Angola
Penda Mbow, Senegal
Adam Michnik, Poland
Emin Milli, Azerbaijan
Yascha Mounk, USA
Surendra Munshi, India
Ghia Nodia, Georgia
Andrej Nosov, Serbia
Šimon Pánek, Czech Republic
Rosa Maria Payá, Cuba
Andrei Piontkovski, Russia/USA
Marc Plattner, USA
Jerzy Pomianowski, Poland
Rodger Potocki, USA
Arch Puddington, USA
Xiao Qiang, China/USA
Jacques Rupnik, France
Karel Schwarzenberg, Czech Republic
Lilia Shevtsova, Russia
Uffe Riis Sørensen, Denmark
Daniel Stid, USA
Tamara Sujú, Venezuela
Rostislav Valvoda, Czech Republic
Alexandr Vondra, Czech Republic
Christopher Walker, USA
George Weigel, USA
Leon Wieseltier, USA
Jianli Yang, China/USA
Richard Youngs, United Kingdom
Michael Žantovský, Czech Republic